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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
inaugural balls can do, recognizing the work of the people that have worked to get the president elected. in the 1840s, when andrew jackson was the president, he opened up the white house, much to his chagrin, because it was trashed because of that, but he wanted popular people type of event, not a formal ball. >> you can watch the president inauguration at the white house, and monday, the public ceremony , but first his weekly radio address, where he talked about recent proposals for reducing gun violence he asked the american people to find out where their representatives stood. >> hi, everybody. i announced a series of concrete steps we should take to protect our children and community from gun violence, growing out of meetings held with more than 200 different groups, from parents and teachers, to law enforcement and sportsman, to religious leaders and mental health professionals. in the weeks ahead, i will do everything in my power to make them a reality. while we might not be able to protect every act of senseless violence, if there's anything we can do to reduce it it, if one life
to help elect pro-choice women across this country. i am so proud to be one of nine emily's list women reelected in 2012 to the u.s. senate's and one of 20 women sworn in earlier this month, the most ever in our nation's history. no one runs for senate alone. no one runs for senate alone and wins. i was never alone, not for a singesingle minute. you were with me every single step of the day. back in may 2011 when the senator announced that he was retiring, i convened a conference call to figure out whether there was a way i could step up and run. just like you have been with me for so long, emily's list was there for me at that moment. you were there day one when i ran for the house of representatives bac in 1998. the pungent scent i cannot win. you read there with me. -- you were there with me every step of the way. i became the first woman to represents a woman in the house o. and on the first day of this long journey you were there for me with sage advice, plenty of encouragement and a commitment to stand with me every single day. you follow it through and then some. thousands of yo
's list, held a banquet for some of the newly elected female representatives. house democratic leader nancy pelosi addressed the gathering and the new 113th congress has 20 women now serving in the u.s. senate. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> good morning, everyone in. thank you very much. [applause] thank you. this, being a sunday morning, i want to begin by saying that this is the data god has made, that us rejoice and be glad. let us rejoice and be glad that as we gather here in the white house, barack obama is being officially sworn in as the president of the united states. earlier this day, joe biden was sworn in as vice president of the united states. tomorrow, it will be a ceremonial, but today it is official. what a great day. what a great day that we are celebrating emily's list success in strength in numbers. women leading the way. isn't that exciting? 15 more women senators in the united states senate. that is remarkable. in this cycle, we have 80 more democratic women in the house bringing our number to 61 women in the house. [applause] you hear a lot about how peo
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
, you know, president obama is now won election twice with over 5%, 50% of the vote, which is, you know, he is, he and joe biden, those only two offices everybody votes for. and he has won. he got over 50%. so he will make his case. i think what is different, what is significantly different, there will be confrontation but i think the first time you're seeing the president move hess campaign organization, we just saw this in the last few days, move it into advocacy on the issues for his agenda during the second term. that's unprecedented. no president's ever been able it do that. and this time it is not with some rinky-dink campaign organization that we've seen in the past. this is the biggest campaign organization ever seen in the united states. 28, 30 million people. those people making the case to their members of congress regardless of party, whether the member is democrat or republican. i think could change the way we look at a lame duck second term presidency because of the power of that grassroots organization. bill: wow! that's a big statement, joe. back to the initial question
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
of the strength of how his legacy will continue it will actually be the 2016 election that will tell us. if you look at history only if a person of the same party is elected after that to turn president that the policies of that present a continue to get in grain and truly part of the cultural fabric. the republican is elected in 2016 you will see some dismantling of certain things. the saw with george bush after ronald reagan. it does not happen very often in history. there's not much of a crowd left at all. matter where you figure in politically you cannot argue that president obama is an incredible writer an incredible speaker. very much appreciated around these parts. folks now moving on to the next stage of this. it is along pennsylvania avenue. the parade they're looking forward to. the first family finishes that quick lunch. about 45 minutes. all of that food that is making me so hungry earlier in our coverage. they arrived very early this morning. kind of like we did here at the national mall for our coverage. they brought along with them some young people from around chicago. that is
. it was relatively easy it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to do was notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legislators. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine ex
party and here for an election celebration. he misspoke and said, you know, i am happy to be the president of the united states or something like that. jumping the gun a little bit. officials from south carolina and new hampshire. just want to mention that. who knows what the field will look like in a couple of years. a broad overview. not looking backwards but looking forward. giving the grand vision. perhaps, mentioning some of the issues he wants to tackle. gun control, deficit reduction. as you said, waiting on the big details until the state of the union address. neil: you mentioned finding common ground. we may have gotten a hint on that when republicans said they would look at eight debt ceiling it ascension back ago, probably, three months. what do you make of that? don: they would be blamed, roundly, thoroughly if the country went into some kind of default. the strategy, as you have been reporting, has been to try to take this issue off the table and then fight the battle over spending cuts when you have a sequestration cuts scheduled to start march 1. the curr
to do which is represent the people of the united states. we have a democratically elected republic and people need to pull out their history books and find out what that is and realize that when we send them to office, would give them the authority to vote the way we feel and if we feel they are not representing our opinions and needs, we need to replace them. thank you very much. host: stephen dinan will be joining us at the bottom of the hour. later, author and historian richard norton smith will dig in the details of the second term and what this president could be facing. this headline is from "the washington examiner" -- the public information officer for the u.s. capitol police is joining us on the fund. guest: for having me. host: we look at the seams around washington, what can visitors expect tomorrow? guest: they should expect that we will do our best to protect people. give time to get through lines and things of that nature. host: this is a map we found this morning in "the washington post." the area in red it will be the high-security area. many of the roads around the
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
that dr. king talked about 50 years ago been fulfilled, would to re-election of president obama? >> i think you cannot deny that we have made tremendous progress and the election of -- re- election of president obama is another milestone moment in civil rights history, but we still have a long way to go as far as racial reconciliation in america, building what dr. king called the beloved community. tomorrow, yes, it is a milestone moment, not only for the president, but for america's quest for racial reconciliation. >> we have two experts. john mcconnell worked with george bush on his inaugural address. terry edmonds spent eight years working with bill clinton. we talked about the reference to dr. king. your former boss making reference to abraham lincoln in his second inaugural address. >> we will get that ready in just a moment. let's go to the phones. curtis from akron, ohio. >> thank you for taking my call. it is a pleasure to be on the air. i had the privilege, when i was 20 years old, i was on the executive board of kent state democrats. me and some of the members of the executi
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
dynamics on the hill. a republican house that was elected within their districts by large margins and president who won an election. how do we bridge the gap? how do we actually get the deal done. >> we have a system that is incremental in nature. we're not a parliamentary system where, if you control the government, you can move very quickly and aggressively. i have always said that the american politics is played on the 40-yard line. and both sides feel very strongly about their philosophical position. but there is a deep identity of interest that i think needs -- leads to premature should lead to agreement. if you're the president of united states, there are two events that you know may occur in the next four years, which could totally derail your capacity to do the of the things you want to do about the nation, your positive agenda. the first is the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction. i think this president has been dedicated to intelligence gathering and his use of various capabilities to reduce that threat. and secondly, the issue of the financial crisis driven by the
back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to iran. it did not work. for that, i accept full responsibility. it was not wrong to try to save lives. certainly, it was not wrong to try to secur
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)